Architect Pitsou Kedem - Penthouse

Architect Pitsou Kedem's stunning, unconventional design blurs the borders of private rooms and outside areas, in his development, in the old north of Tel Aviv.  This special penthouse covers a total floor of some 600 square meters and is open and transparent in four instructions. The penthouse is wrapped with a display of clear walls.  The internal spaces floating within the building’s shell are exposed to the city passages and movement.  No rooms connect with this outer shell and no rooms block or shut off the view of the city.  The amounts of transparency and exposure are regulated using a variety of approaches of shading, so that extended and steady lines of sight are preserved from one to the other.  The residents amazing collection played a substantial position in the design and style of the spaces, each relating to that particular piece in it.

Along the complete frontage, there are transparent, teak framed sliding doors which enable for the opening and closing of the different inner spaces. The city merges into the apartment, climate is regulated as residents get pleasure from the sky line and shifting lights at any provided time.  The resources utilized in the apartment’s development are for the most portion proven in their raw state. The floor is poured terrazzo and an exposed concrete wall in the living area is offset with a metal bookcase.  The pool is entirely covered with dark stone so that the city can be reflected in its entirety in the water. 






























“ I dream of a new age of curiosity. We have the technical means for it; the desire is there; the things to be known are infinite; the people who can employ themselves at this task exist. Why do we suffer? From too little: from channels that are too narrow, skimpy, quasi-monopolistic, insufficient. There is no point in adopting a quasi- protectionist attitude, to prevent 'bad' information from invading and suffocating the 'good'. Rather, we must simply multiply the paths and the possibilities of comings and goings."

Philosopher Michel Foucault